Archive for the ‘Technology’ Category

REVA Electric Car

December 6, 2007

RAVAII

REVA Electric Car Company Private Ltd. (RECC), based in Bangalore, India, was established in 1994 as a joint venture between the Maini Group India and AEV LLC, California USA, to manufacture environment-friendly and cost-effective electric vehicles. Seven years of R&D earned the RECC recognition in the form of 10 patents and a globally accepted product. REVA, India’s first zero polluting Electric Vehicle for city mobility, was commercialized in June 2001. The success of commercializing REVA at affordable prices stems from the support it has received from The Maini Group. The Group has been committed to producing zero-pollution transportation equipment and automotive components since 1984. RECC is guided by the “zero principle” of the Maini Group. Zero defects, zero time delays, zero inefficiencies and zero pollution. This is achieved through Zero Wastage and Zero Compromises.  The vision of RECC is to establish a tradition of excellence and leadership in environment friendly urban transportation by offering the best value and highest quality electric vehicles for city mobility.

 REVA

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Fondo Educativo ENA

November 27, 2007

Last week we attended the inauguration of one of the ten computer center we are donated on behalf of the Project named “Fondo Educativo Enrique Novella Alvarado para Telesecundarias, Centros de Tecnología en los Básicos por Telesecundaria del Departamento de El Progreso.” Which objectives are to improve the educational conditions in rural communities through technology. In order to be competitive in today’s world.

Unfortunately the fund can only help ten rural communities. I’m trying to get further funding in order to help additional communities and give more children the opportunity to have technology in their classrooms.

If you are interesting in donating I will gladly provide further details of the program.

Now, please enjoy some pictures of the inauguration.

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India’s Rural Poor- How can we learn from them?

November 16, 2007

SRISTI is a non-governmental organization setup to strengthen the creativity of grassroots inventors, innovators and ecopreneurs engaged in conserving biodiversity and developing eco-friendly solutions to local problems. SRISTI was set up provide organizational, intellectual and logistics support to the Honey Bee Network, which was founded by Prof. Anil K. Gupta in 1998. Honey Bee Network is an online database of rural innovation that can range from everyday rural problems, like a bicycle used as a washing machine to herbal treatments handed down over generations. Honeybee has catalogued more than 50,000 innovations by rural entrepreneurs. They help them license their technology and to patent their inventions. It is a way of empowering rural people to develop their ideas, create business partners and make connections. As Mr. Gupta says:

“We don’t want a system where you first create a lot of growth and try to create a lot of Corporate Social Responsibility programs as a nod to the poor; you include them as stakeholders right up front.”

Go Green

October 2, 2007

On my way back home I read the “The Green Issue” from American Way and found great facts about our environments and about “us” consumers. It has become such a hot topic over the years, receiving great attentions from scientist, environmental organizations, press, etc.

Take a look at the facts and reflect a little on what we can do to make a difference. It can be as easy as replacing a normal toilet paper for a recycled one.

Green Energy

FACTS:

Worldwide consumption of bottle water reached 154 billion liter (41 billion gallons) in 2004, and increase of 57 percent in five years.

The average washing machine uses 40.9 gallons of water per load; high-efficiency washing machines use less than 27 gallons of water per load.

Organic farming is typically 30 percent more organic than traditional farming.

Storm windows reduce hear kiss though the windows by 25 to 50 percent.

The average car emits twice its weight in CO2 each year.

Half of the forest that originally covered 48 percent of the earth’s lands surface are gone.

Disposable diapers take 200 to 500 years to decompose.

At the current rate of warming, all the glaciers in glacier national park will be gone b7 2070.

It takes 90 years to grow a box of tissues.

Last year, China overtook the U.S. as the biggest CO2 emitter.

The number of hurricanes worldwide classified as either Category 4 or 5 has almost doubled in the past 35 years.

In the United States, it takes about a third of a pound of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides to grow enough cotton for one T-shirt.

Every year, the catalog industry sends out more than 20 billion catalogs – that’s 67 catalogs for every person in America.

Globally, sea levels could possibly rice more than 20 feet with the loss of Greenland and Antarctica shelf ice.

When cars cruise at 65 miles per hour rather than at 55 miles per hour, the carbon monoxide emissions more than double per mile driven.

A typical U.S. household generates 45,00 pounds of greenhouse gas emissions per year.

Wind-power installation has increased by 500 percent in the United States since 1999.

In order to prevent the Taj Mahal from being polluted, visitors must park nearly two miles away and take battery-run buses or horse-drawn carriages to the monument.

Twenty years ago; only one curbside recycling program existed in the United States. By 2005, almost 9,000 curbside programs had sprung up across the nation.

The Untied State uses nearly $1 million worth of energy every minute.

One modern wind turbine produces enough energy to meet the annual electricity needs of 500 homes.

The National Recycling Coalition reports that recycling supports 1.1 million jobs in the United States.

Low energy computers saves their owners as much as $300 per year in electricity costs.

In North America alone, more than 350 million cartridges per year are discarded in landfills, and that number increases by 12 percent annually.

If every household in the United States were to replace just one package of new fiber napkins with 100-percent recycled, it would save one million trees.

If every household replaced one roll of toilet paper with a roll of recycled post consumer waste, 424,000 trees would be saved.

Microwaves are between 3.5 and 4.8 times more energy efficient than tradition electric ovens. If everyone in North America cooked exclusively with a microwave for a year. We’d save as much energy as the entire continent of Africa consumes during that same amount of time.

Carpooling with someone just two days a week will reduce your CO2 emissions by about 1,590 pounds a year.

Americans throw away 25 billion foam cups each year.

Driving 10 fewer miles every week would eliminate about 500 pounds of CO2 emission per year.

In the United States each year, more than 100 billion pounds of food is wasted by consumers, retailers, and restaurants.

If everyone in the world were to consume like the average U.S. citizen, we would need at least four more Earths.

Every 20 minutes, the world adds another 3,500 human lives but losses one or more species of animal or plant life.

More than one billion people lack access to a safe supply of drinking water.

Proper inflation of your cars tires can improve gas mileage by more than 3 percent.

Eight trees will cancel out four years’ worth of garbage.

Consumers and industries in the United States throw away enough aluminum to rebuild the entire U.S. commercial air fleet every three months.

67% percent of all major appliances are recycled.

One Laptop Per Child

April 10, 2007

I just came back from my vacations in Guatemala. Over my break I had the honor to present a fund, dedicated for the education and development of Guatemala, to the Ministry of Education.  It’s a fund name after my father “Enrique Novella Alvarado” who always believed in the development of education, specifically, giving the children of the rural communities of San Miguel the opportunity to have a formal education using today’s technology.

During the conference I had the opportunity to see the laptop developed by the “One Laptop Per Child” organization. The Guatemalan government hopes to bring this technology to them.

It is estimated that will help around 400,000 children.

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Kickstart: The Tools to End Poverty

February 27, 2007

KickStart is a non-profit organization that develops and markets new technologies in Africa. These low-cost technologies are bought by local entrepreneurs and used to establish highly profitable new small businesses. They create new jobs and wealth, enabling the poor to climb out of their poverty forever.

KickStart’s Impacts To Date

Over:

  • 50,000 new businesses started
  • 800 new businesses per month   
  • $52 million a year in new profits and wages generated by the new businesses
  • New revenues equivalent to more than 0.6% of Kenya’s GDP and 0.25% of Tanzania’s GDP.

PumpPump Manual 

Above is a picture of Kickstart Super MoneyMaker Pressure Pump.

To learn more check out thier site Kickstart